Alex Foley Shows Up in Wrong Council District

Councilman David Marks questions why his challenger Alex Foley showed up at the wrong council forum?
Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Ben Jealous has been mocked by Gov. Larry Hogan supporters for not knowing what state his is running for Governor (He said at a campaign rally that he will be the next Governor of Virginia) and he spend last weekend campaigning in California right before Early Voting. There is a similar candidate on the local level that does not know his boundaries and voters.

Alex Foley is the Democratic nominee for the County Council seat in the 5th District. Foley has run a very bizarre campaign. Councilman David Marks, his Republican opponent, criticized Foley in September for placing his illegal signs at Indian Rock Park in Perry Hall. Marks also criticized Foley for not participating in any of the six scheduled candidate forums.

I, along with my other voters, were surprised to see Foley at a candidate forum at Harford Park in Parkville last week. The only problem is that Harford Park is the home of County Council District 6 and the candidates (Democratic Councilwoman Cathy Bevins and GOP nominee Ryan Nawrocki) were at the forum. Foley sat in the audience and introduced himself to individuals during the intermission. Marks immediately jumped over Foley’s appearance in the wrong district

“Sometimes, [Foley’s] campaign has left me almost speechless. He skipped six community forums in a row. But tonight, he showed up to one – in the wrong County Council district,” Marks said. “Meanwhile, I was meeting voters in the correct County Council district.”

I asked Foley on social media why he attended a forum in Council 6 instead of Council 5. He really did not give a great explanation.

“Mr. Marks does not dictate how I reach my future constituents. The leaders of our community are worthy of respect, not discourse, that isn’t productive I value the constituency. I wish to lead in positive directions not to follow Mr. Marks. His wishes to control the narrative, is not my concern. Although I respect the query, these local offices need to support each person, community and taxpayers. You are the one I want to work for,” Foley said in response to my question.

Foley said he feels very confident that he will beat Marks. Why? Because he claims he received more overall votes than Marks in the primary. In reality, Marks actually received 5,235 votes compared to Foley’s 5,194 votes. But comparing a Democratic and a Republican vote total is like comparing Apples to Oranges. There are more registered Democratic voters in the district, so more votes should be cast in a Democratic primary compared to a Republican primary.

“You may also want to know why I got more votes than the Incumbent republican. But as it may make this race more interesting, I am not running to be interesting, I am running for the voter,” Foley explained.

With all due respect to Mr., Foley, I don’t think all those Democrats that voted for you in June will vote for you again on Nov. 6.

Wolf Becoming Star in Baltimore County

Craig Wolf is becoming a rock star here in Baltimore County. The Republican nominee for Attorney General has an uphill battle against current Democratic Attorney Gen. Brian Frosh. Polls in August showed Wolf down by 32 points but a poll last week showed Wolf only down nine points. He has really hit Frosh hard about not protecting the citizens of Maryland but instead worrying about suing President Donald Trump’s federal government.

Craig Wolf (second on the left) attended the “Three Joes” event last Friday with Councilman David Marks, Del. Joe Cluster, Del. candidates Joe Boteler & Joe Norman and state Senate candidate Del. Christian Miele.

Last Friday, Wolf attended a fundraiser for Sen. John Salling in Essex and later went to a fundraiser in Perry Hall for the “Three Joes” (Del. Joe Cluster, Joe Boteler and Joe Norman) in District 8. Wolf was a big hit with the crowd as many of the attendees posed for pictures with Wolf. I have also seen him at GOP County Executive nominee Al Redmer events and other Republican candidate events.

I talked to Wolf at the “Three Joes” event and asked him why he is always in Baltimore County. He responded that Baltimore County is a “make or break” jurisdiction for his chance to defeat Frosh. I agree. Gov. Larry Hogan is polling at 63 to 37 percent in Baltimore County against Ben Jealous and Redmer has an opportunity to win the Country Executive’s race. Wolf will need all those Hogan and Redmer voters to cast a vote for him too.

This reminds me of 2014 when Hogan was down big early to Anthony Brown. Later, Hogan narrowed the gap within a week or two of Election Day. Then Hogan’ s campaign caught fire and he flew pass Brown in the final week.

I am starting to see similarities with Wolf. I thought Wolf had a chance to win in March, then lost confidence after the first poll showed him down by 32, and now I’m starting to see him catch fire in the final three weeks. I’m hoping that Wolf pulls it off.

Opioid Epidemic Conservation Sadly Turns Political

It is hard to believe that a treatment organization such as The Rx Abuse Leadership Initiative (RALI) of Maryland could turn a discussion about the opioid epidemic into a partisan discussion, but that appears to be the case.

RALI is holding a forum on the Opioid Epidemic at Perry Hall High School on Thursday, Oct. 4 from 6 to 8 p.m. Some of the guest speakers expected at the event are County Executive Don Mohler, State’s Attorney Scott Shellenberger, state Sen. Kathy Klausmeier and Delegate Eric Bromwell. All those elected officials are Democrats and Bromwell’s Republican delegate colleagues Joe Cluster and Christian Miele were not invited to the event, along with 5th District Republican councilman David Marks.

“Bipartisan, inclusive leadership is needed to eliminate the opioid epidemic in Baltimore County and throughout our state. Baltimore County Councilman David Marks, Delegate Joe Cluster, and I hope that the sponsors and organizers of tomorrow night’s community forum in Perry Hall reconsider their decision to only invite elected officials from one political party to participate,” Miele said in a social media statement.

Miele, Cluster and Marks sent out a letter to RALI of Maryland requesting an invite to this forum for this important and non-partisan issue.

Another participant of the event is John Torsch, who is from the Daniel Carl Torsch Foundation. The foundation is named after John’s brother Daniel who passed away from an accidental drug overdose in 2010. He promoted the event on a Perry Hall community Facebook page. Torsch was also a Democratic candidate for county council in the spring and is unaware why Republicans were not invited to the forum.

“That’s a question for the organizers of the event. I’d love to see more elected officials on both sides of the aisle speak up about the addiction epidemic and actually do something about it,” Torsch said on social media.

Councilman Marks, who could have potentially faced Torsch in November defended Torsch and commended him on his work.
“John is a good man, and I have learned a lot from him. I am still learning. He is a participant and not the organizer,” Mark said about Torsch.

The problem with having a nonpartisan event a month before the election is that many people are in a political frame of mind on both sides. There was a person who questioned why Kathy Klausmeier was even invited.
“Just say No to Klausmeier!” said a commenter to Torsch. He appropriately responded that the event is about saving lives.

“I tell you that more than 300 people died from drug overdoses last year in your area. We’re on pace for even more this year. And all you can say is “say no to Klausmeier “? That’s just sad. This isn’t about left or right. It’s about life and death. Baltimore County is losing,” Torsch said.